Book Of Secrets

Book Of Secrets Loreena McKennitt: The Book Of Secrets

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Book Of Secrets

The Book of Secrets - Mckennitt, Loreena: harlingerskutsje.online: Musik. Shop Book of Secrets. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible orders. This item:Book of Secrets by Loreena McKennitt Audio CD £ Only 2 left in stock. Sent from and sold by uniqueplace-uk. THE MASK & THE MIRROR by.

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Shop in deiner Gegend. Weitere Informationen zu unseren Apps finden Sie hier. So much about Mage is making unique characters, and this gives you plenty of tools to make a Mage character your way. Product Reviews. Book Of Secrets

Of course ther This is a book that will stick with me. Of course there are growing pains, both for the nation and for the people, but this nation does manage to come through all of that.

This book is a book of generations that lived through all these tumultuous times. The story stretches from to and is connected by a diary left by a young British Commissioner from the time that he served in a small town called Kikono.

A retired schoolteacher is given the diary in the 's and he sets out on a personal quest to ferret out the secrets that are exposed by this diary.

Vassenji easily slips from one era to another in this book. And all from the perspective of one town in East Africa called Dar. That is where the schoolteacher is and that is where the diary has eventually turned up in a storage room in an old shop.

The book paints such vivid pictures of a time and place that I felt that I was there. Excellent book. The only place where it fell down a bit for me was in the fact that many of the mysteries were left unexplained.

But that is really not so different from real life after all. View 1 comment. Jan 18, Kiera Healy rated it it was ok.

It was a big let-down. I stopped and started it a couple of times, because the opening section - a POV-shifting look at a colonial official's diary circa - was so tedious!

Some elements here are nice. Vassanji's descriptive writing is frequently beautiful, and his attention to det I read and loved The In-Between World of Vikram Lall a few years ago, so I tried out this earlier work by Vassanji.

Vassanji's descriptive writing is frequently beautiful, and his attention to detail in terms of local colour is superb. But the plot is terrible.

It's several stories within a story, following a retired teacher an Indian expatriate living in Tanzania who comes to own this diary and starts obsessing over it, despite the fact that it is boring as hell.

As the plot progresses, you read sections that seem like vague, uninteresting tangents and suddenly realise that they are essential elements of the story.

Because the narrative voice is so removed from the action, there's little dialogue, lots of "then time passed" passages, and it's hard to care about any of the characters.

I was also frequently confused by the longevity of the characters - it seems anyone who doesn't die violently lives forever! I really didn't enjoy this novel, but I'd still strongly recommend The In-Between World of Vikram Lall, which deals with similar themes - the experience of Indian expatriates in East Africa at the end of colonialism - but is actually an interesting and compelling read.

The diary enflames the curiosity of a retired schoolteacher, Pius Fernandes, whose obsession with the stories it contains gradually connects the past with the present.

Inhabiting the story is a memorable cast of characters, part of an Asian community in East Africa, whose lives and 1 STARS "The Book of Secrets is a spellbinding novel of generations and the sweep of history that begins in in Dar es Salaam, when the diary of a British colonial officer is found in a shopkeeper's back room.

Inhabiting the story is a memorable cast of characters, part of an Asian community in East Africa, whose lives and fates we follow over the course of seven decades.

Rich in detail and description, M. Vassanji's award-winning novel magnificently conjures setting and the realm of eras past as it explores the state of living in exile from one's home and from oneself.

Sep 25, Sandeep rated it it was amazing. Amazing multi-generation fictional story about Ismailis in East Africa, starting from the period before WWI, when they had just converted to Islam and therefore preserved Hindu customs, something which would conflict with successively Arabised future generations.

Aug 23, Mike rated it it was ok. This book had some interesting history about East Africa in it. I found it kind of confusing and hard to follow at times.

Oct 31, Jody rated it really liked it. Amazing book! But it has such an inconclusive ending, so many unanswered questions, that I really have no idea what I should talk about in my presentation tomorrow Loved this one.

This was the first Vassanji I read, and enjoyed it more than a few of his following works. Jul 20, Pamela rated it liked it.

Thank goodness. It was a disappointment and a style that I do not enjoy. I think it made some important points about postcolonialism, but the narration left me cold, and there was way too much telling, and not much showing.

And I never got to know any of the characters enough to have an opinion about them. But I'm done. I was a brief meeting, at the airport lounge, prior to her departure.

She took the diary gratefully from me, then pointedly asked, 'And everything else? And so we parted; she to return to London. What I can never disclose, give to the world, is mine only in trust.

The constant reminding presence of a world which I created, a history without the relief of an outlet, can only serve to oppress.

And so I have decided to relinquish it. Only then can I begin to look towards the rest of my lfe and do the best with the new opportunity has has come my way.

In a short while, a man will call to pick up this package of material--notes and scribblings and research I have put together for Rita. It is, as she put it, 'everything else,' everything I have written and compiled in relation to the diary--which I have come to think of as a new book of secrets.

A book as incomplete, as the old one was, incomplete as any book must be. A book of half lives, partial truths, conjecture, interpretation, and perhaps even some mistakes.

What better homage to the past than to acknowledge it thus, rescue it and recreate it, without presumption of judgement, and as honestly, though perhaps as incompletely as we know ourselves, as part of the life of which we are all a part?

For Rita, then, all this. To do with as she will, to bury it if she must and if it will allow her. After I have surrendered this material, which overtook my life for these past months, I will go out and take a walk along Uhuru Street, and perhaps even stroll into the mnada, the bustling discount market where it all began, where Feroz, my former student, recognized me and stopped to give me a lift, and later put an Englishman's diary into my hands.

Some shopping may be in order, now. At the end of a recent letter, Sona invited me to visit Canada and the U. A fare has been offered, and I have gratefully accepted the invitation.

A holiday abroad at this time will not go amiss. When I return to Dar it will be to this same apartment, thanks to Feroz, and--more important--to a new position which, after much effort, he has finally found for me.

It it that of a part-time teacher at a new private school that has emerged to meet the recent growing demands to reinstate the rigorous standards we had once in education.

The headmaster of this school is from Kenya, and he has already given me a tour of the place. I must confess, rather unfairly I started comparing: the grounds of this school are not even a fifth of those of the old Boyschool.

But it is a new generation of pupils I will teach, boys and girls of mixed race, bright, with fresh hopes and promise, whose up-to-date experiences and outlooks are bound to challenge and rejuvenate even this old teacher.

I don't know the full story behind the job, what strings were pulled, and I will not speculate at this point. I have told the headmaster I will take a month off, to go abroad, before returning to take up my duties.

The new job, I expect, will allow me to undertake some projects that I have recently promised myself to pursue.

But I must stop now, the man has arrived for the package. Pius Fernandes 12 August, Dar es Salaam" hide spoiler ] They meant no harm; everyone always mean know harm.

Harm was never meant, but harm was done. Colonialism, first contact, exploration, imperialism. All of it, for greed, religion, power, whatever.

Harm was done. How is it every repaired? However, Corbin was a very small cog in a big wheel. Is he responsible?

Who is? All of us? Today the word Empire is taboo and colonialism is discredited. We do not have subject races but underdeveloped nations. A chapter of world history has therewith been closed.

We went with the best of intentions, to give of our best Very well expressed. The admission doesn't come easily. I suppose I could have left after Gregory died.

But where, and to what end? Only filial duty would have taken me to India, but by then both my parents were dead.

And the loneliness of old age can come upon one anywhere. This city where I first landed forty years ago has so grown on me, it is like an extension of my self.

I will never shed it. I do like that, although I don't like a lot in this book. To be exposed to new ideas, to be made to read and understand so much, was a privilege.

In my mind I thanked the shopkeeper-administrator many times over for having given me leave. There's a lot of telling, not much showing though.

Marriage put a successful end to youth: the religion proclaimed that, the community acknowledged that. With marriage you were finally accepted: the women came and talked to you, called you 'bhai'--brother--and men treated you as one of them.

In answer, the Swahili proverb says, 'When two elephants fight, it is the grass that suffers. Corbin discovers paradise, or something like it, but is it?

And is it enough? He had heart of spirits resident if mbuyu trees and naturally had ridiculed the idea, but in this menace-filled darkness, in this loneliness, all one's scientific objectivism seemed vulnerable.

He knew it to be four o'clock when the rich and rising cry of the brave muezzin rallied against the thick darkness. Such a desolate cry of the human soul in the vast universe.

Was there an answer, a response? And then the Shamsis preparing for their mosque. They were a hard lot, who could match the early Christians in their zealousness.

First the mosque caretaker got up and went around the village knocking on doors. Gradually those who felt inclined would make their way to the mosque.

Then for a space of half an hour there would be silence -- while they meditated, so he was told. I saw that the ephemeral tie between them--the tragic young woman Mariamu--would become the most tenacious bond of all.

I saw an old uncertain world give birth to a new, no less fragile one, and I followed the trail of this book, from the pen of a lonely man to the obsession of another, from ancient lives caught up in imperial enterprise and a world war to these, our times: and finally to myself, and the hidden longings of my past.

At the end of it all, I too lie exposed to my own inquiry, also captive to the book. But it began simply, the story of this book, an unusual discovery put into the hands of an out-of-work schoolteacher, who at last found his calling and began to work with an industry and enthusiasm he had not mustered since his apprentice days.

What does it mean? Already, it means more than when I read it. Does that mean I need to go back and go back and go back? Of its writer they said: He steals our souls and locks them away; it is a magic bottle, this book, full of captured spirits; see how he keeps his eyes skinned, this mzungu, observing everything we do; look how meticulously this magician with the hat writes in it, attending to it more regularly than he does to nature, with more passion than he expends on a woman.

He takes it with him into forest and on mountain, in war and in peace, hunting a lion or sitting in judgement, and when he sleeps he places one eye upon it, shuts the other.

Yes, we should steal this book, if we could, take back our souls, our secrets from him. But the punishment for stealing such a book is harsh--ai!

Feb 16, Chana rated it liked it Shelves: africa , world-literature , crime , british , historical-fiction , war , pop-sugar-challenge , fiction-family-drama , german.

I loved the atmosphere in this story; languid, slow-moving, hot and dusty; a snapshot into a past that is gone. Then there were pops of activity, some of it worrisome, even scary.

The story asks a lot of questions and pretty much answers none of them. As a reader that didn't please me, but I just decided to enjoy the atmosphere of the book and if no question was ever answered that was OK.

I did find it a bit on the depressing side because it goes on for a long time and people's lives seem so futi I loved the atmosphere in this story; languid, slow-moving, hot and dusty; a snapshot into a past that is gone.

I did find it a bit on the depressing side because it goes on for a long time and people's lives seem so futile as they are born, raised, matter to others, make their mark or not in the world, grow old and irrelevant, then die; and the world just goes on.

Kind of eclectic but interesting and realistic -- this is NOT the book for those who like all the loose ends neatly tied up.

This book intentionally and explicitly leaves most of the strings untied. It's a bit of history and family saga in Dar es Salaam, where British colonials, Indians, and Africans co-exist though not necessarily peacefully.

It's not about death and destruction though war happens. It's a novel about people's lives in a culture and time period different from any in North Amer Kind of eclectic but interesting and realistic -- this is NOT the book for those who like all the loose ends neatly tied up.

It's a novel about people's lives in a culture and time period different from any in North America or Europe.

A good read, but not one that you want to pick and put down repeatedly or drag out; if you do that you'll lose the threads and not appreciate the narrative.

Jan 28, Mary Ripley rated it it was ok. Forced myself to finish this book. The African history was interesting but I did not enjoy and learn how to follow the thread of personalities in the story.

It all seemed contrived and overly complicated. Oct 29, Jax rated it did not like it Shelves: canadian , award , abandoned.

Did not finish. Jun 08, Kamalendu Nath rated it really liked it. Quite a fascinating angle of storytelling with an unique style providing an insight into two Colonial East African countries and its select inhabitants.

Many characters invite you to its own mystery along with the time and places that come vividly alive. Also, the frequent use of some native terms one could refer in the back of the book , for me, made the narration a bit choppy although the intent of an authentic flavor is appreciated.

But what I liked most of this book is that important plots or episodes and characters, in some sense remain unfinished, challenging the reader to ponder upon the clues provided!

Oct 20, Jim rated it really liked it Shelves: fiction. A nice, fine novel set mostly in Kenya and Tanganyika largely during the colonial period from the early twentieth century to about The story is told by an Indian teacher who is given a diary that compels him to uncover the intertwined history of a colonial British administrator, a young and tragically murdered bride and her merchant husband, and their son, who will later marry a woman for whom the teacher had feelings.

It provides an interesting glimpse into the life of muslim Indians A nice, fine novel set mostly in Kenya and Tanganyika largely during the colonial period from the early twentieth century to about It provides an interesting glimpse into the life of muslim Indians who immigrated to the region and served largely as the merchant class, though it avoids the trap that some novels hit the reader withnamely a detailed description of even the most minute local custom.

To a degree one feels that the stories are not completely told, left dangling, so to speak, but it also seems intentional. There are side stories as well, such as the relationship among three teachers at a private boys' school.

Anyone interested in southeast Africa will find it a good read, if they don't mind the gradual unfolding of a story.

As you can see from my rating, this book just did not capture me at all. By the time the story got rolling, I was already starting to wish it was over and wondering what I should read next.

I do have a quote to share tho As you can see from my rating, this book just did not capture me at all. I do have a quote to share though, from the very first page.

I had such high hopes. This is very similar to how I felt when I got my first glimpse of the landscape of Malawi as my plane descended to Lilongwe Airport in I want to go back….

Shelves: worst-book-ever. I recommend starting this book on page You really wouldn't miss much because at page I still had no real solid idea of what was going on.

This book jumps around and at times I thought maybe a new character was being introduced. To be fair maybe I just took too long to read this book and then I would forget what was going on although the book was just to easy to skim read or put down.

I even lost it once and not on purpose maybe I should have taken that as a sign. I really can't put my f I recommend starting this book on page I really can't put my finger on what was wrong with this book.

Too many words that were put in for filling, too much jumping around???????? I still couldn't tell you. There were some good story plots amongst all the hummdrumm but All in all I wouldn't read this book again but will definitely keep it without the dust cover because it looks cool and old.

What do they always say "never judge a book by it's cover". I definitely think that they might be right about this one.

Mar 19, Allie Farrell rated it it was ok Shelves: historical-fiction , canadian-lit. I did not care for this book. It's the third time I've tried to get through it, and was successful at my attempt, but it doesn't feel much like success as it bored me to tears.

Every time I've tried reading it, I wonder what I must be missing because the excerpts of the reviews on the cover and on the front pages are uniformly awed by the book, and these quotations are excerpted from some rather fine publications that I usually trust.

Not this time. The novel is a story within a story. A retired I did not care for this book. A retired schoolteacher, down on his luck, is given access to a diary, which belonged to Assistant District Commissioner Alfred Corbin, in the years leading up and the years of the First World War, when Kenya was British East Africa.

There is some secret going on, and I never figured out what that was, which is probably why this novel has never made sense to me. Reading it was an irritating process and I'll be selling it back to the used bookstore the next time I make that journey.

It shows that Ben's great-grandfather was a co-conspirator in Abraham Lincoln's murder. They discover a plank that has early Native American writing on it.

The plank has only one symbol that Patrick Gates Jon Voight can identify. The symbol is Cibola see-bowl-uh , meaning the City of Gold.

After thirty-two years, it brings back old arguments. After that, the other clue is in the Written by mviedirctr First of all, National Treasure, the first one, is one of my favorite movie ever.

I love history, specifically American history, and it had clever references and facts about American history that lead to finding the treasure in a way that is not predictable.

It almost felt like the writers could not think of any new, clever clues for Nicolas Cage to solve or more suspense without action scenes.

First lets look at the positives. This movie was very well-done. The acting was as superb as the first Nicolas Cage and Justin Bartha are amazing.

It was very believable. Also the action scenes are excellent and full of invigorating suspense. The scene near the unexpected end where they had to balanced the steel block thing in the cave was terrific.

All the action scenes were awesome: right out of an Indiana Jones movie. Another thing I liked was the ironic humor and sarcasm used by Nicolas Cage's character and other characters throughout the movie that gave it a light, fun feel.

With interesting history references and a brilliant score by Trevor Rabin, what could be wrong with it? You may not agree with me.

But I felt that the ending, and a few other scenes were rushed. For example, they spent literally about five minutes in Paris both finding and figuring out the clue.

After that they moved on to London, they spent about 15 minutes there, 5 of them were spent finding the clue. It all felt rushed which tended to confuse me.

And the ending definitely did not satisfy me. It was too sudden and I felt it was incomplete, even though the movie was over two hours long.

As I think back to some of the scenes in the beginning and middle of the movie, I forget why I included "negatives" because it was so brilliant and I loved it as much as the first one.

But then I remember the ending. I can't explain the nice feeling the first movie gave me: its what the perfect movie gives you I guess.

It's a great movie, it just didn't live up to my expectations or the original's. Sign In. Keep track of everything you watch; tell your friends.

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Alternate Versions. Rate This. Benjamin Gates must follow a clue left in John Wilkes Booth 's diary to prove his ancestor's innocence in the assassination of Abraham Lincoln.

Director: Jon Turteltaub. Added to Watchlist. From metacritic. Comic-Con Home Top Moments. Major Comic-Con Home News.

Top Film Seen Hollywood Movies. Use the HTML below. You must be a registered user to use the IMDb rating plugin. Edit Cast Cast overview, first billed only: Nicolas Cage Ben Gates Justin Bartha Riley Poole Diane Kruger Abigail Chase Jon Voight Patrick Gates Helen Mirren Emily Appleton Ed Harris Mitch Wilkinson Harvey Keitel

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National Treasure: Book of Secrets (2007) The President`s book I really can't put my f I recommend starting this book on page I think it made some important points about postcolonialism, but the narration left me cold, and there was way too much telling, and not much showing. To be fair maybe I just took too long to read this book and then I would forget what was going on although the book was just to easy to skim read or put down. Ben clears his family's name with the discovery and is cleared of all charges when the President, in an attempt to protect Ben, tells everyone that Ben saved his Beste Spielothek in Krummennaab finden. His writing is very intense and I often had to go back and read sentences several times before I felt like I fully grasped the concept he was trying Book Of Secrets make. FBI Agent Hendricks. I have retained at least one copy of the Story, and I release TS from any and all liability for loss or other damage to the copies of the Story Dragons Super Rtl to TS hereunder. I saw an old uncertain world give birth to a new, no less fragile one, and I followed the trail of this book, from the pen of a lonely Paypal Ohne Bankkonto Aufladen to the obsession of another, from ancient lives caught up in imperial enterprise and a world war to these, our times: and finally to Die 10 Besten FuГџballspieler Der Welt, and the hidden longings of my past. Ihr Warenkorb ist leer. Log In with Facebook. Aktuelle Bestseller und Neuheiten. Der Link wurde an die angegebene Adresse verschickt, sofern ein zugehöriges Ex Libris-Konto vorhanden ist. Der Tipico Deutschland Kontakt wurde der Merkliste hinzugefügt. See All Reviews. I found it an invaluable book for creating characters for Mage Lynx Basic Ascension.

You really would have to read this book several times to fully understand what Deepak Chopra is saying because the book is just so jam-packed with information on basically everything: how to bring unity to your life, how to remove suffering from your life, how the Universe works, what the meaning of life is, how our standard notion of evil is an illusion, how to understand time, and how to come to terms with death.

My favorite chapters of the book, in particular, were the chapters teaching you how to let go of pain Secret 5: The Cause of Suffering is Unreality, pp.

Both of those chapters were very well written, and I think a lot of people can benefit greatly from reading these sections at the very least.

Unfortunately, there are sections of the book that I did not understand, and not through lack of trying.

Even after reading whole sections twice and thrice, I still don't understand what he was trying to say. For example, there is a section of the book Deepak Chopra says how we need to stop thinking of ourselves as a person p.

He says when we think of ourselves as a person we see the world as ourselves and then everything else. In reality it is that everything is one. I don't understand this.

How can I not be a person? How can I not have been born? It just seems so illogical, and he doesn't explain it well enough in my opinion.

There were, however, many great quotes that I was able to take from this book that I would like to share with you. Hopefully, you, the reader of my review, can connect with these quotes and take something from them.

Maybe you will even appreciate them so much that you would then like to read this book also. It comes from the mind's mysterious instinct to believe that pain is good, or that it cannot be escaped, or that the person deserves it" p.

But in the mindful state, time doesn't really pass at all. There is only a single instant of time that keeps renewing itself over and over with infinite variety" p.

Be sure that the external praise is sincere" p. View all 4 comments. Apr 13, Jacqueline rated it it was amazing.

This book changed my life. Deepak Chopra shows you an entirely new way of thinking and I'm so excited to read other books of his.

He teaches you a new appreciation for life, different ways to turn all of the negatives into positives.

His writing is very intense and I often had to go back and read sentences several times before I felt like I fully grasped the concept he was trying to make.

I definitely think this is a must read for anyone who doesn't realize their full potential. It gave me an en This book changed my life.

It gave me an entirely different view on myself, the universe and everyone around me. I hope to be as wise as him one day in my writing.

Sep 27, Oswald rated it it was amazing. This is a self-help book, but it truly teaches you how to be in a perpetual positive mode.

It teaches you how to not sweat the little things in life. These are my favorite quotes from this book: "Transformation means radical change of form, the way a caterpillar transforms into a butterfly.

In human terms, it means turning fear, aggression, doubt, insecurity, hatred, and emptiness into their opposites".

If necessary, it will die to protect the body, and often does - the lifetime of any given cell is a fraction of our own lifetime.

Skin cells perish by the thousands every hour, as do immune cells fighting off invading microbes. Selfishness is not an option, even when it comes to a cell's own survival".

The primary activity of cells is giving, which maintains the integrity of all other cells. Total commitment to giving makes receiving automatic - it is the other half of a natural cycle".

You can escape the trap only by ending your need to cling to these beliefs". Samskara - "A samskara is a groove in the mind that makes thoughts flow in the same direction.

Buddhist psychology makes sophisticated use of the concept by speaking of the samskara as imprints in the mind that have a life of their own.

Your personal samskaras, built up from memories of the past, force you to react in the same limited way over and over, robbing you of free choice.

But it's only by letting go of each experience that you make room for the next. The skill of letting go can be learned; once learned, you will enjoy living much more spontaneously.

Doubt lingers and ties us to the past. When you are in doubt, however, you put the universe on hold for a while. It favors no particular direction.

But fitting in is like embracing inertia. Social acceptance is the lowest common denominator of the self-it's you as a social unit rather than you as a unique person.

Find out who you really are; let fitting in be the last thing on your mind. I often wonder why people read and I imagine there are many reasons.

I know for myself I'm often selfish about it. I look for the aha moment and those things I see in myself, the answers to my own personal questions.

Sometimes it's no more than the entertainment value. More often than not I don't give the author much thought as I move to the next read.

This book, this author is different. Deepak Chopra gives generously of himself. The words ring true to being his own deeply felt beliefs and the I often wonder why people read and I imagine there are many reasons.

The words ring true to being his own deeply felt beliefs and the things he lives his life by. The author has an uncanny way of dissecting difficult topics succinctly.

I took much away from this read and will most likely revisit it again at a later date. I won't expound on what things I learned here as I would suspect each reader will find there own truth between these pages or at the very least a start to "peeling back the onion" to the core of their personal truths.

View all 7 comments. This book, like many "new age" books, law of attraction books, self-help books, or whatever name you want to use for them, did not add anything new to the book world.

It did not even say things in a unique or different way. In fact, this book is written as if Chopra is trying to sound better than the reader.

I have a degree in physics and years of reading these types of books, and even I could barely follow what he was saying - not because I didn't understand, but because it seemed he was trying This book, like many "new age" books, law of attraction books, self-help books, or whatever name you want to use for them, did not add anything new to the book world.

I have a degree in physics and years of reading these types of books, and even I could barely follow what he was saying - not because I didn't understand, but because it seemed he was trying to make it more difficult to understand.

At least with "The Secret" a good attempt was made to make it understandable for everyone, even if nothing new was added to the field.

Not recommended for beginner or average readers in metaphysics, new age, or law of attraction. Feb 07, Julie Laporte rated it really liked it.

This is the first book I've read by Deepak Chopra I must say, I'm hooked! I love that he's an MD as well, as he speaks my language!

I love when scientists back up their spirituality thus. I read this book as I fell asleep each night and had the most fantastic of dreams, and woke up feeling wonderful!

The content didn't contain much new information for me, but it was told in a great way that helped remind me of what I be This is the first book I've read by Deepak Chopra The content didn't contain much new information for me, but it was told in a great way that helped remind me of what I believe and will help me to express it to others.

Awesome book. Contains some nice mental exercises, too. Jun 22, Beth Oppenheim rated it really liked it. What a great book. I think that Deepak's writing style is a bit challenging, but the ideas are all there - finding the strength to push through the bullshit and see who you really are.

Some of the things I particularly liked about it: - The bullet point format of each chapter made it easy to figure out the concepts which are, by default, a bit cerebral - The stories about Chopra's life, particularly the description of the death of his father, were very compelling.

I wanted more of them, and thi What a great book. I wanted more of them, and think it would have strengthened the narrative.

It sounds dumb, but in a world so based on hierarchy, figuring out the way to make things flat is a really good stress relief.

Jul 30, Jules rated it really liked it. Given the amount of information in this book I expect to read it several times again.

Essentially, I intend to study it, not only for review but also to check the validity of certain parts. There are things stated in this book that I'm skeptical about, for example Deepak's endorsments of several Hindu beliefs and ideologies.

Nonetheless, even with the more doubtful parts taken in consideration the overall benefits in thought, concious, and ideas that I walked away with made the read worth the ef Given the amount of information in this book I expect to read it several times again.

Nonetheless, even with the more doubtful parts taken in consideration the overall benefits in thought, concious, and ideas that I walked away with made the read worth the effort.

Deepak's ability to correlate complex ideas with simplified examples from everday life is impressive and engaging. I didn't dread reading this book at all.

If anything I figure I was so caught up that I read it too quickly, anticipating whatever chapters came next. But again, after having finished reading it I'm determined to go back and go deeper.

Jul 02, Heather rated it liked it. I thought this book was a little hard to get into, and some sections I appreciated more than others. Overall I enjoyed the book.

My favorite section was on decision making This isnt a correct assumption because the universe is flexible - it adapts to every decision you make.

View 2 comments. Dec 26, Pankaj rated it did not like it. Sometimes I think Deepak Chopra has no idea about what he's writing.

All time borrower of old knowledge that guy is. It all began when I recently joined a group meditation with Deepak Chopra. I'd heard the name, of course, and seen his books in the bookshop, but never really had the desire to pick any of them up.

The message just didn't seem for me. Meditation, on the other hand, is something I've long known would be good to pursue, as a way to calm the anxious mind and "get over myself", as it were.

Surprisingly, Mr Chopra really appealed to me with his demeanor and lack of pretentiousness. If I had to pick a guru I won't , he' be pretty close to what I'd be looking for.

I've been doing his guided day meditation for the past 12 days, and sometimes, his little notes of introduction really struck a note with me, so I checked the library for available titles by him.

Predictably, I still didn't feel drawn to most of them, but this one intrigued me because it pointed exactly at the kinds of explorative questions I've been dealing with lately.

The Book of Secrets has given me a lot of food for thought. It's certainly not something to be read and cast aside as part of a to-read list.

I'm sure I will come back to it again in the future. For readers who fear the mysterious blather of esoterism, I can honestly say, give it a try anyway.

No magical trappings are required to explore the possibilities of transcendence scary term, I know. Jul 30, Neil Mudde rated it it was ok.

When reading anything bt Deepak Chopra, one needs to be prepared for some of his "new age" visions and ideas the book claims to "unlock the hidden dimensions of your life" Much in the book is common sense, other things need to be taken with a grain of salt.

His writing is always interesting, as there are always some thoughts he writes about, which make a bit of sense, and is nothing mysterious, simply taking care of oneself in every aspect of life, taking care of your health by what you eat, exerc When reading anything bt Deepak Chopra, one needs to be prepared for some of his "new age" visions and ideas the book claims to "unlock the hidden dimensions of your life" Much in the book is common sense, other things need to be taken with a grain of salt.

His writing is always interesting, as there are always some thoughts he writes about, which make a bit of sense, and is nothing mysterious, simply taking care of oneself in every aspect of life, taking care of your health by what you eat, exercise, getting a lot of sleep.

When reading a book on the "improvement of ones life" I tend to look at a picture of the person writing this, in some cases there physical appearance does not always denote that they are following healthy eating habits, and I realize this puts me into judegment of others which is not a good idea to do.

As a side note, once in a while I get caught up looking at some of these tele evangelist, many of whom obviously live lifes from the "fatted calves" which are often those poor persons who have been brainwashed into sending them moneys in order that they can live this oppulent life style Enough on this!!!!

Sep 27, Matthewmartinmurray murray rated it did not like it Shelves: put-off-reading. Possibly the worst book I've ever even attempted to read. Too much b.

Just awful. If I could rate this lower I would. There needs to be some sort of negative star system because of this book.

Honestly, I've never gotten angry reading any other book before. Apr 04, Bryce Holt rated it it was amazing. This is a collection of scientific and psychological teachings affixed to a genuine guidebook for the soul.

I loved it. Chopra puts the soft press on his audience to recognize the interconnections of the world and the self, the ridiculousness of fearing death, and a dozen other "secrets.

It feels very personal in the audio format as if you have your own guru to tap This is a collection of scientific and psychological teachings affixed to a genuine guidebook for the soul.

It feels very personal in the audio format as if you have your own guru to tap into whenever you're driving around in your car.

Nov 21, Elizabeth Alaska rated it liked it Shelves: lateth-century , awards-scotiabank-giller. This was completely unfamiliar territory for me.

Set in what was then called British East Africa, now Kenya, the community is one of Indian immigrants. The premise of the novel is interesting. A retired schoolteacher, whose major was history, is presented with a partial diary written just before the outbreak of WWI.

It was kept by the only white man in the village, the Assistant District Commissioner. The first part of the book follows the diary pretty closely, although some sections are expande This was completely unfamiliar territory for me.

The first part of the book follows the diary pretty closely, although some sections are expanded upon by the teacher. For the rest of the novel the teacher has researched the Indian characters of the village at the time, and extended their lives through both wars and to the present-day, that being when he first saw the diary in I am not a storyteller and know nothing about constructing a story, most especially not how to write a novel.

With as much reading as I do, I am somewhat struck that I really never thought about how a novelist goes about his craft nor especially considered where the ideas come from.

But early in this was the idea that novelists must start with a germ of something like "What if In this case, obviously, what if a man finds an old diary by someone who is unrelated to him.

I liked the story and the premise and it kept me reading. However, I was unable to related to any of the characters or the setting. I did learn something, I think, as I had not realized that East Africa might have a considerable Indian population.

I thought: sometimes it's helpful to look at a map, Elizabeth. There are many places Indians might emigrate, and East Africa would certainly be one of them.

And so, I reveal here two missing pieces in my thought processes. It's never too late in life to learn, I guess. This was my first taste of M.

While I won't be rushing out to buy it, I will be glad to read it eventually. Feb 02, Carolien rated it really liked it Shelves: african-fiction , The book focuses on a part of history that doesn't often get attention in fiction - the First World War in East Africa and the Gujarati Indian community in Kenya and Tanzania.

The plot is quite intricate and I like the fact that the author still retains some secrets at the end of the book for the reader to ponder.

I read this book along with the Great African Reads group, as they focus on a different Kenyan author every month in I appreciated getting to read this book for several reasons: -It won the Giller Prize in , and I always want to expand my reading of Canadian authors -I had not yet read or learned of how the European conflicts in World War I effected their African "colonies.

A few things made the book not as enjoyable of a read: -The ongoing battle of the desire to read native authors.

This is a strange instance because Vassanji grew up in Africa, although now resides in Canada. But still the primary voice in the novel is the colonialist Corbin, and the actual Africans are spokes of his wheel.

The narrator once Corbin isn't as central, Fernandes, is so far removed from the time and place of the story being told, it's probably not the best way to tell the story!

Jul 10, Angela rated it it was ok Shelves: reviewed. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.

First: what I liked about the Book of Secrets. I've never read a book set in this part of the world and so that was new to me. I know very little of the colonial history of Kenya and East Africa.

Also, the women in the story, particularly Mariamu, were vivid compared to the male characters. Sadly, I did not enjoy this book as much as I had hoped I would.

Perhaps my attention span is suffering so I won't blame First: what I liked about the Book of Secrets. Perhaps my attention span is suffering so I won't blame the author--the writing was good--but I had a hard time getting through the novel at all.

Mariamu was the most interesting character to me and I was able to pay attention when the author described her and her relationships to her husband and to her son.

When she died, I almost didn't want to finish the book. Her presence remains strong throughout the remaining pages and that was well done. But there were long sections devoted to the war WWI as it pertained to colonial Africa and to military intelligence etc.

The ending tied the various threads together in a way that was satisfying but the mysteries were not ultimately "solved," which is, I believe, the main theme of the novel: the unknowability of history.

Dec 24, Karen rated it it was ok. I had such high expectations of this book. Let me explain. I mean really, what are the odds of the guy investigating the big mystery having been infatuated the girl at the centre of it all?

The diary was from decades ago, found in a wall of a shop. Suddenly Rita is in the p I had such high expectations of this book. Come on! It seemed to cheapen the plot and I never got over it.

It was an easy out for the author, a plot device I considered a cheat. It also completely destroyed the tension in the book.

The readers knew the characters had the answers but weren't sharing them and in the end they didn't. Kind of crummy in my opinion!

I always read the Giller winners and it must have been a slow year when this book got the nod. This is a book that will stick with me.

Vassanji is one of my favourite authors. This book was the first to win the prestigious Giller Prize and it is the last one in my quest to read all the Giller Prize winners which I undertook about a year ago.

I really enjoyed this book, both for the history and for the people that Mr. Vassanji has created.

The book is about the changes experienced in an East African nation-from a Commonwealth Country, through a war and onto independence.

Of course ther This is a book that will stick with me. Of course there are growing pains, both for the nation and for the people, but this nation does manage to come through all of that.

This book is a book of generations that lived through all these tumultuous times. The story stretches from to and is connected by a diary left by a young British Commissioner from the time that he served in a small town called Kikono.

A retired schoolteacher is given the diary in the 's and he sets out on a personal quest to ferret out the secrets that are exposed by this diary.

Vassenji easily slips from one era to another in this book. And all from the perspective of one town in East Africa called Dar. That is where the schoolteacher is and that is where the diary has eventually turned up in a storage room in an old shop.

The book paints such vivid pictures of a time and place that I felt that I was there. Excellent book. The only place where it fell down a bit for me was in the fact that many of the mysteries were left unexplained.

But that is really not so different from real life after all. View 1 comment. Jan 18, Kiera Healy rated it it was ok.

It was a big let-down. I stopped and started it a couple of times, because the opening section - a POV-shifting look at a colonial official's diary circa - was so tedious!

Some elements here are nice. Vassanji's descriptive writing is frequently beautiful, and his attention to det I read and loved The In-Between World of Vikram Lall a few years ago, so I tried out this earlier work by Vassanji.

Vassanji's descriptive writing is frequently beautiful, and his attention to detail in terms of local colour is superb.

But the plot is terrible. It's several stories within a story, following a retired teacher an Indian expatriate living in Tanzania who comes to own this diary and starts obsessing over it, despite the fact that it is boring as hell.

As the plot progresses, you read sections that seem like vague, uninteresting tangents and suddenly realise that they are essential elements of the story.

Because the narrative voice is so removed from the action, there's little dialogue, lots of "then time passed" passages, and it's hard to care about any of the characters.

I was also frequently confused by the longevity of the characters - it seems anyone who doesn't die violently lives forever! I really didn't enjoy this novel, but I'd still strongly recommend The In-Between World of Vikram Lall, which deals with similar themes - the experience of Indian expatriates in East Africa at the end of colonialism - but is actually an interesting and compelling read.

The diary enflames the curiosity of a retired schoolteacher, Pius Fernandes, whose obsession with the stories it contains gradually connects the past with the present.

Inhabiting the story is a memorable cast of characters, part of an Asian community in East Africa, whose lives and 1 STARS "The Book of Secrets is a spellbinding novel of generations and the sweep of history that begins in in Dar es Salaam, when the diary of a British colonial officer is found in a shopkeeper's back room.

Inhabiting the story is a memorable cast of characters, part of an Asian community in East Africa, whose lives and fates we follow over the course of seven decades.

Rich in detail and description, M. Vassanji's award-winning novel magnificently conjures setting and the realm of eras past as it explores the state of living in exile from one's home and from oneself.

Sep 25, Sandeep rated it it was amazing. Amazing multi-generation fictional story about Ismailis in East Africa, starting from the period before WWI, when they had just converted to Islam and therefore preserved Hindu customs, something which would conflict with successively Arabised future generations.

Aug 23, Mike rated it it was ok. This book had some interesting history about East Africa in it. I found it kind of confusing and hard to follow at times.

Oct 31, Jody rated it really liked it. Amazing book! But it has such an inconclusive ending, so many unanswered questions, that I really have no idea what I should talk about in my presentation tomorrow Loved this one.

This was the first Vassanji I read, and enjoyed it more than a few of his following works. Jul 20, Pamela rated it liked it.

Thank goodness. It was a disappointment and a style that I do not enjoy. I think it made some important points about postcolonialism, but the narration left me cold, and there was way too much telling, and not much showing.

And I never got to know any of the characters enough to have an opinion about them. But I'm done. I was a brief meeting, at the airport lounge, prior to her departure.

She took the diary gratefully from me, then pointedly asked, 'And everything else? And so we parted; she to return to London. What I can never disclose, give to the world, is mine only in trust.

The constant reminding presence of a world which I created, a history without the relief of an outlet, can only serve to oppress.

And so I have decided to relinquish it. Only then can I begin to look towards the rest of my lfe and do the best with the new opportunity has has come my way.

In a short while, a man will call to pick up this package of material--notes and scribblings and research I have put together for Rita.

It is, as she put it, 'everything else,' everything I have written and compiled in relation to the diary--which I have come to think of as a new book of secrets.

A book as incomplete, as the old one was, incomplete as any book must be. A book of half lives, partial truths, conjecture, interpretation, and perhaps even some mistakes.

What better homage to the past than to acknowledge it thus, rescue it and recreate it, without presumption of judgement, and as honestly, though perhaps as incompletely as we know ourselves, as part of the life of which we are all a part?

For Rita, then, all this. To do with as she will, to bury it if she must and if it will allow her.

After I have surrendered this material, which overtook my life for these past months, I will go out and take a walk along Uhuru Street, and perhaps even stroll into the mnada, the bustling discount market where it all began, where Feroz, my former student, recognized me and stopped to give me a lift, and later put an Englishman's diary into my hands.

Some shopping may be in order, now. At the end of a recent letter, Sona invited me to visit Canada and the U. A fare has been offered, and I have gratefully accepted the invitation.

A holiday abroad at this time will not go amiss. When I return to Dar it will be to this same apartment, thanks to Feroz, and--more important--to a new position which, after much effort, he has finally found for me.

It it that of a part-time teacher at a new private school that has emerged to meet the recent growing demands to reinstate the rigorous standards we had once in education.

The headmaster of this school is from Kenya, and he has already given me a tour of the place. I must confess, rather unfairly I started comparing: the grounds of this school are not even a fifth of those of the old Boyschool.

But it is a new generation of pupils I will teach, boys and girls of mixed race, bright, with fresh hopes and promise, whose up-to-date experiences and outlooks are bound to challenge and rejuvenate even this old teacher.

I don't know the full story behind the job, what strings were pulled, and I will not speculate at this point. I have told the headmaster I will take a month off, to go abroad, before returning to take up my duties.

The new job, I expect, will allow me to undertake some projects that I have recently promised myself to pursue. But I must stop now, the man has arrived for the package.

Pius Fernandes 12 August, Dar es Salaam" hide spoiler ] They meant no harm; everyone always mean know harm. Harm was never meant, but harm was done.

Colonialism, first contact, exploration, imperialism. All of it, for greed, religion, power, whatever. Harm was done. How is it every repaired?

However, Corbin was a very small cog in a big wheel. Is he responsible? Who is? All of us? Today the word Empire is taboo and colonialism is discredited.

We do not have subject races but underdeveloped nations. A chapter of world history has therewith been closed. We went with the best of intentions, to give of our best Very well expressed.

The admission doesn't come easily. I suppose I could have left after Gregory died. But where, and to what end? Only filial duty would have taken me to India, but by then both my parents were dead.

And the loneliness of old age can come upon one anywhere. This city where I first landed forty years ago has so grown on me, it is like an extension of my self.

I will never shed it. I do like that, although I don't like a lot in this book. To be exposed to new ideas, to be made to read and understand so much, was a privilege.

In my mind I thanked the shopkeeper-administrator many times over for having given me leave. There's a lot of telling, not much showing though.

Marriage put a successful end to youth: the religion proclaimed that, the community acknowledged that. With marriage you were finally accepted: the women came and talked to you, called you 'bhai'--brother--and men treated you as one of them.

In answer, the Swahili proverb says, 'When two elephants fight, it is the grass that suffers. Corbin discovers paradise, or something like it, but is it?

And is it enough? He had heart of spirits resident if mbuyu trees and naturally had ridiculed the idea, but in this menace-filled darkness, in this loneliness, all one's scientific objectivism seemed vulnerable.

He knew it to be four o'clock when the rich and rising cry of the brave muezzin rallied against the thick darkness.

Such a desolate cry of the human soul in the vast universe. Was there an answer, a response? And then the Shamsis preparing for their mosque.

They were a hard lot, who could match the early Christians in their zealousness. First the mosque caretaker got up and went around the village knocking on doors.

Gradually those who felt inclined would make their way to the mosque. Then for a space of half an hour there would be silence -- while they meditated, so he was told.

I saw that the ephemeral tie between them--the tragic young woman Mariamu--would become the most tenacious bond of all.

I saw an old uncertain world give birth to a new, no less fragile one, and I followed the trail of this book, from the pen of a lonely man to the obsession of another, from ancient lives caught up in imperial enterprise and a world war to these, our times: and finally to myself, and the hidden longings of my past.

At the end of it all, I too lie exposed to my own inquiry, also captive to the book. But it began simply, the story of this book, an unusual discovery put into the hands of an out-of-work schoolteacher, who at last found his calling and began to work with an industry and enthusiasm he had not mustered since his apprentice days.

What does it mean? Already, it means more than when I read it. Does that mean I need to go back and go back and go back? Of its writer they said: He steals our souls and locks them away; it is a magic bottle, this book, full of captured spirits; see how he keeps his eyes skinned, this mzungu, observing everything we do; look how meticulously this magician with the hat writes in it, attending to it more regularly than he does to nature, with more passion than he expends on a woman.

He takes it with him into forest and on mountain, in war and in peace, hunting a lion or sitting in judgement, and when he sleeps he places one eye upon it, shuts the other.

Yes, we should steal this book, if we could, take back our souls, our secrets from him.

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